Tag Archives: @Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s The ‘Seven Ages Of Man’ speech

Shakespeare’s The ‘Seven Ages Of Man’ speech

As You Like it A2SC7

Jaques:

All the world’s a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.

Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

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“Where Thou, Art?”

“Where Thou, Art?”

There was a black Hamlet,

and a white Othello,

all the youths were salad green,

and Dogberry was yellow;

Lady Macbeth was spotty,

and King Lear, he was dotty;

all in all, a colourful performance

of Shakespeare’s ‘Where Thou, Art?’

With a little nod to Shakespeare.

With a little nod to Shakespeare.

Once upon a time they lived happily ever after; but, not any more.

Nowadays they live from table to mouth, from door to door, from birth to death; and their final breath is one of grateful acceptance.

That’s not to say that they don’t thrive whilst they survive the whips and scorns, the chips and acorns, and all the other trials and tribulations that their living flesh is heir to.

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – The Bill.

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – The Bill.

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – The Bill.

Ben: Will? Or may I call you ‘Bill’?

Will: Will, will do, Ben, or may I call you Edna?

Ben: Edna?

Will: Edna Bucket.

Ben: Ha! Very funny, Will. Edna Bucket! (Ben chuckles)

A short pause

Will: So?

Ben: ‘So’ what, Will?

Will: You wished to ask me something a few sentences back?

Ben: Oh, Yes. I remember. Will?

Will: Yes?

Ben: Is it your turn to get the bill?

Will: The bill, Ben?

Ben: Yes, Will, the bill.

Will: I, Will…

Ben: Great!

Will: Continuing- I, Will Shakespeare, being of sound mind-

Ben: Allegedly, Will, allegedly.

Will: Repeat, ‘being of sound mind’ have no intention, whatsoever, of letting Ben Jonson have another ‘free lunch’ at my expense.

Ben: But, Will? The bill!.

Will: We shall, henceforward, refer to it as ‘the Ben’, Ben. ‘Waiter’ my friend here would like to pay the ‘Ben!’

Ben: But, Will?

Will: No ifs, no buts, and we haven’t even discovered coconuts yet. G’day, Ben.

Ben: Oh, dear. Looks like the washing-up for me.

“And the rain it raineth every day!”

Song: “When that I was and a little tiny boy (With hey, ho, the wind and the rain)”

BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

(from Twelfth Night)

When that I was and a little tiny boy,

    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

A foolish thing was but a toy,

    For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came to man’s estate,

    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

’Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate,

    For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came, alas! to wive,

    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

By swaggering could I never thrive,

    For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came unto my beds,

    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

With toss-pots still had drunken heads,

    For the rain it raineth every day.

A great while ago the world begun,

    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

But that’s all one, our play is done,

    And we’ll strive to please you every day.

Will and Ben: Renaissance Men – Second Best Bed

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – Second Best Bed.

Will: My Second Best Bed? It’s in the wash. Why do you ask, Ben?

Ben: How could your bed be in the wash, Will?

Will: Second Best Bed, Ben.

Ben: Okay. How could your Second Best Bed be in the wash, Will?

Will: When you put your mind to something, Ben, you will find a way to achieve more than you could dream of.

Ben: Yes, Will; but, in the wash!

Will: Ben, Ben, Ben! It is a metaphor. My Second Best Bed is not a bed to lie upon.

Ben: I’ truth?

Will: It is a saying that says not the message that the words combine to form. For example: ‘My Second Best Ben is in the Ale House.’

Ben: You have another friend that calleth himself ‘Ben’, Will?

Will: No, Sirrah. It is thee! When thou are in the Ale House you are not my Best Ben, but my Second Best Ben. Due to the Ale that thou consumest.

Ben: Ah! Now I see; but, about your bed…?

Will: I lied upon it, Ben.

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – ‘Lichen’

Will & Ben: Renaissance Men – ‘Lichen’

Will: Shall I compare thee to a lump of moss…

Ben: Lichen!

Will: Okay, if you prefer, Ben. ‘Shall I ‘liken’ thee to a lump of moss.

Ben: ‘Sigh!’