Tag Archives: #Cornish

Kevnisen (spider)

Kevnisen the spider

(known to his mates as Kev)

left home to join the priesthood,

taking residence in the church,

where he grew best friends with the Rev

and on Sundays

upon the rostrum he did perch.

Holly the Cornish Witch

Holly the Cornish Witch lived a long, long life.

Living in Cornwall, as she did, in the sixteenth century, as she did, meant that witches usually went out in a roar of flames. But, being Cornwall, which it was, the superstitious Cornish thought that it was mightily unlucky to burn Holly, which it wasn’t.

Therefore, they were very reluctant to burn Holly the witch, which she was, and so they didn’t.

Holly the Witch, c.1517 – 24th March 1603.

She died of natural causes, which they were, upon the very day that Good Queen Bess, which she wasn’t, died.

Saturday Butterfly Flutterby

Saturday:

Butterflies flutterby,

nonchalant, en passant,

colourful passersby,

de rigueur, tykki Duw,

papillon, butterflies.

“Enough! Enough!” said the Cornish Chough.

“Enough! Enough!” said the Cornish Chough.

“I’ve seen it all, from blag to bluff,

from Land’s End

to the Tamar’s tuff,

all around the county!”

spoke the Cornish Chough –

in a voice, some say,

that seemed rather rough.

HOWLVLUEJENN – Sunflower!

It may be venting it down

here in Cornwall,

it may be doing so in Kent;

from the Firth of Forth

to the Fief of Fife,

with an unwillingness to relent;

but, when,

the Howlvluejenn

‘do’ raise their gaze on high

we can see with them

the reason why

their Golden faces

face the Sun

and eye to eye

their work is done.

🌻

‘Euvergryjyans!’

‘Euvergryjyans!’

the writing’s on the wall;

and, maybe I can’t pronounce it,

but pride before a fall;

and, as a black cat once said to me,

whilst crossing my path,

‘salt over your shoulder,

before you’re much older,

see which way up it lands,

or the Devil will find work

for your too idle hands.’

Awenek Poem

Dydh da!

Meurastahwi.

Marthys!

Ny wonn vy ‘awenek’

Well, anyway, I’ve used it in a poem;

out of context – of course –

and ‘margh’ is Cornish for horse

which gives the rhyme

to make this a poem,

and just in time.

Splann!

©️graemesandford.com

‘Three Cornish Ducks’

Three Cornish ducks,

all called Bob

fishing for their supper:

Proper Job!

Kernewek Haiku?

Ny won vy, how

to do Kernewek Haiku,

so, meurastahwi.

Gool Peran Lowen – Trelawny (Song of the Western Men)

Trelawny (Song of the Western Men)

Lyrics by Robert Stephen Hawker (1804–1875)

A good sword and a trusty hand,
A merry heart and true!
King James’s men shall understand
What Cornish lads can do.
And have they fixed the where and when?
And shall Trelawny die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!

And shall Trelawney live?
Or shall Trelawney die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!

Out spake their Captain brave and bold:
A merry wight was he:
“If London Tower were Michael’s hold,
We’ll set Trelawney free!
We’ll cross the Tamar, land to land,
The Severn is no stay:
With ‘one and all’, and hand in hand,
And who shall bid us nay?”

And shall Trelawney live?
Or shall Trelawney die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!

“And when we come to London Wall,
A pleasent sight to view,
Come forth! come forth ye cowards all,
Here’s men as good as you!
Trelawney he’s in keep and hold:
Trelawney he may die:
But twenty thousand Cornish bold
Will know the reason why!”

And shall Trelawney live?
Or shall Trelawney die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!